Technology

Modern-Day Outdoorsman Technology

Over the past 10 years, technology has changed hunting dramatically. The days of long hours spent scouting the outdoors for game are no longer necessary. The invention of the trail camera now allows hunters to pattern game when they are not in the woods.

That’s right! A camera is now a tool that the modern-day hunter uses to reduce his time spent in the woods when not hunting. Some would say this advancement has made the outdoorsman lazy, and some would say it has made him a cheater in the sport of hunting.

In either case, these “HighTech Rednecks” as they are sometimes called, are buying more and more trail cameras each year. The cameras are continuing to advance and are also becoming more affordable.

A trail camera is basically a weatherproof camera that mounts to a tree and is activated by motion. The features found on most trail cameras range from infrared, rapid picture mode, time-lapse, video mode, and cellular communication.

The Bushnell cameras have several features which include “quality craftsmanship and crystal-clear images/video to help you prepare and improve your next hunt,” according to http://www.bushnell.com.

For a cellular activation and monthly fee, a trail camera can be activated to send every picture it takes to a cellular device in a text message. It is now possible for an outdoorsman to be in one state and effectively scout game in another state.

Technology has changed the laws of hunting immensely. When hunters look at the convenience and advantage of the trail, camera ethics also can be considered. Is it more of a challenge that the outdoorsman has to rely solely on physical signs of wildlife to locate and pattern the game he is hunting, or is it more of a strategic advantage to the modern day hunter who can now sit at home and receive text message pictures from his trail cameras anywhere around the world?

There are some hunters who have rebelled against the use of technology in the outdoors. They claim it is cheating and wish to continue to use the old school techniques of their forefathers who would spend countless hours walking the woods and fields searching for the signs left behind from the game they were hunting. They rely on trails, tracks, droppings, tree markings, and mating signposts to locate the game they pursue.

Who would have thought that technology would have made such a controversial change for the modern day hunter. Who knows, maybe someday hunters might not even have to enter into the woods to hunt. If technology continues, outdoorsmen will be harvesting game remotely from their lazy boy chairs someday.

Categories: Technology